Avon, Colorado

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Honoring Verne Albertson: Nimon-Walker 2018

First, let's get those details to you: 
 

What: The 17th Annual Nimon-Walker Award honoring Verne Albertson

Where: Avon Public Library, 200 Benchmark Road in Avon

When: Sunday, April 29th 2-4 PM

Special presentation by Michael Crouser, 2018 Colorado Book Award Finalist; Photographer.

 

"Beanies, Stick Horses, Marbles, & Mean Chickens: Growing up in Burns, Colorado in the 1940s"

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On May 12, 1939, the Eagle Valley Enterprise published an article thanking local firms that helped build Eagle County.  After ten years of Depression economics, businesses were hard-pressed to stay open. 

So, When Was That?

Very frequently, I am presented with glorious photographs of local places or people with no clue as to when the photos were taken.  Less frequently, there will be a caption on the back of a photo saying, for example, that it is of “John Buchholz  1942.”  Knowing that John Buchholz died in 1932, I am somewhat suspect that this photo was actually taken in 1942.  Call me a cynic. So, what do we do about dating photos? We can actually look to the photograph to        provide some clues.  This involves studying the  photo and any housings carefully, with a magnifying glass if necessary.  Mary Lynn Ritzenthaler and Diane Vogt-O’Connor in Photographs: Archival Care and Management have some great hints when determining a date or period:    

Odd Lots

 Visual literacy is the process of examining a photograph for detail and then making inferences base on those details.  Does the photograph raise any questions?  My primary question is usually “Who is holding the camera?”  That question, if answered, may provide a great deal of context.  Another question might be “Is a particular event being photographed?”  Wedding photographs are usually very obvious.  “Who is in the photograph?” may present the most frustration if the photo isn’t labeled.  Tracking down someone who can do that identification can be extremely difficult depending on the age of the photograph. With that said, there are several photographs this week that grabbed my attention.

Revolutions Redux

Electricity came late to rural Eagle County.  By 1928, the town of Eagle had an established grid.  Many less populated areas relied on generators, mostly gasoline driven.  Avon, with a population spread over many ranched miles, was without commercial electricity in 1928 but it did have the Eagle River.  Emmett and Myrtle Nottingham decided that they would use the fast-flowing river to produce electricity.