Eagle County, Colorado

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Digital Archive 101

Change can be hard, but we are confident you'll love the new Digital Archive. Watch this quick tutorial to learn how to locate, navigate, and discover everything we have to offer! And as always, if you have more questions, please do not hesitate to contact the library by phone (970-328-8800) or email us (history@evld.org). We'd love to help! 

Honoring Verne Albertson: Nimon-Walker 2018

First, let's get those details to you: 
 

What: The 17th Annual Nimon-Walker Award honoring Verne Albertson

Where: Avon Public Library, 200 Benchmark Road in Avon

When: Sunday, April 29th 2-4 PM

Special presentation by Michael Crouser, 2018 Colorado Book Award Finalist; Photographer.

 

"Beanies, Stick Horses, Marbles, & Mean Chickens: Growing up in Burns, Colorado in the 1940s"

Photoshop in the Archive

I really know my history.

I mean, I better know my history. I’m the Local History Librarian, after all. I credit my expertise to the caliber on my mentors, like when Teddy Roosevelt and I went on that hiking trip. We had a great time, the guy is pretty sharp. Here's a picture of us having fun. (He said I should have brought a jacket and long pants, but I laughed and said, "Oh, Teddy! That's a good one!") 

Nimon-Walker Award Event Honored at Governor's Awards

Since 2001, the library has partnered with the Eagle County Historical Society to recognize individuals whose work has helped preserve the history of Eagle County through the Nimon-Walker Award.

 

When I took over our Local History department, I remember thinking, How can the library give such a specific award every year? There’s really someone in the area every single year that has done something amazing for local history? Wait, that many people are interested in local history?

The answer became very clear: a resounding yes.

The CCC Boys in Eagle County

It’s 1934.

You’re about to turn 18 in the middle of the Great Depression—what sort of luck is that? No job, no prospects, trying to help your parents feed the family any way you can. One day, you’re using your last ration stamp for sugar and you see a sign: the United States government has created a work program and it pays $1 a day. Food, water, shelter, even clothing. Did I mention it pays $1 a day? It’s hard, manual labor, but at least you’ll be outdoors. You ask yourself: Where do I sign up?! 

Ledgerdemain—no flimflam except for spelling

Since we’ve entered April, Happy Tax Month!  I know you’ve been asking yourself what happens to old government records.  Governments at every level…municipal, county, state, federal…are great record generators.  While they are being used, records are organized and stored for retrieval.  At some point, each record is evaluated to determine how long it needs to be kept. This record retention schedule determines the lifespan of a record…whether it will be kept indefinitely or whether it will eventually be destroyed.  For the federal government, the National Archives only keeps permanently 1-3% of all records . This same process happens at the County level and Eagle County has similar record retention schedules. Records1